Archive for October, 2008

The Bishops

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008


Mac and Bert are the names of these two British 25pdr. self-propelled artillery known as Bishops. These figures are ideal as ‘mobile artillery’ for the Memoir ‘44 Mediterranean Front expansion and I’ll be sure to figure out some stats to work them into the Tide of Iron, Days of the Fox expansion. Weakly armoured but packing a 25pdr. punch, these are sure to be good infantry support!

Painted Desert – Part II

Sunday, October 19th, 2008

Now that the tanks have been painted the markings go on.  No need to track down expensive decals, British tank markings are relatively easy.  The main marking is the 8th army symbol that is a broad white band with a thinner red stripe (see above).  This goes on the side of the turret and/or along the sand guard just above the tracks.  The other marking is the Desert Rats emblem.  Put one on the back as well if you like

Painted Desert – the British

Friday, October 17th, 2008

Is that you Stu?!?With the much anticipated Memoir ‘44 Mediterranean Front expansion now coming out and with Days of the Fox for Tide of Iron already out, I thought I would share the latest techniques I’ve developed to paint up the British tanks.  Realizing that much like me, most of you would rather play than paint but may want a little more visual appeal I wanted a method that was fast and easy. So here’s what I’ve done for my Crusader tanks (and the Valentines I’m currently working on..or the Stuarts shown above).

  1. Mount the tanks – using a glue gun, glue them to the heads of nails and place in a foam block
  2. Base Coat – for a good quick base coat I’ve recently discovered Krylon camouflage spray works perfect.  For the desert tanks, use the light tan color.  Spray all of your mounted tanks as a group but make sure you do a nice light coat or two and get in between the wheels. Let dry.
  3. Wash – no, not with soap and water (though, not a bad idea before starting this whole process). What I mean here is a black wash.  Mix a couple of drops of black and dark brown with water to get it fairly thin buut not too thin or you’ll have to do it again.  Not too dark either.  Let dry completely.
  4. Highlight – Drybrush on some Armour Sand color (from Testor’s Model Master Acryl line…or something similar).  Go easy and don’t fill in the cracks, that’s where your wash should show through.
  5. Details, details – I do the tracks and road wheels now.  Mix some grey with black to get a very dark grey.  Let dry then drybrush the tracks with some metalic silver mixed with black (or brass or copper if you want a rusty look).
  6. Finish – I use Krylon matte finish spray.  Works great.

That’s it!  Of course you could put on a camouflage scheme (do it a very smoky grey after the drybrush step) and you could also put on some markings.  The British 8th army armoured used a bar of white with a red stripe in the middle, very easy to do.  Look around online for other markings.

Omaha Beach, Allies Strategies

Tuesday, October 14th, 2008

Omaha Beach is one of the tougher beginner scenarios. The German defenses are quite tough. Given the optimum cards, what strategies would you take as the allies?

Charlescab (Tanks Alot on Vassal)

How to take the beach?

Exit Hex – the Clog

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

I’ve run across an issue a few times now that is more prevelant in Tide of Iron but does at times occur in Memeoir ‘44 as well.  Some scenarios will have an ‘exit hex’.  The point here is to get some of your units off in order to score points.  Sounds easy enough.  But both my wife an I have developed a ‘clog’ strategy to this end.

The ‘clog’ is simply a matter of putting units in such a was as to prevent the exit of a unit often with your friendly units camping out on the exit hex.  This forces your opponent to muster the firepower to knock that unit aside before it can exit.  While sometimes it may be a slight delaying tactic at other times, it may cost the game.

Admittedly, this does seem to occur more in TOI than M’44.  There are two reasons for this.  One, in TOI, more than 1 unit can occupy the exit hex which results in more units to eliminate to clear the hex and two, TOI seems to have a more restricted exit policy in that only a couple of hexes actually qualify as exit hexes.  M’44, for the most part, has exit hexes as the entire back row.

I put the clog strategy into action not long ago in the TOI scenario competition winner, Blood on the Mountain (good, solid scenario.  I can see why it won!).  My American forces were relentlessly being hammered (and a devastating un-observed artillery strike!) but I was comforted in the fact that there was a time limit and all I had to do was hold a couple of key hexes.  While I lost the majority of my forces, I carried the game due to the Clog.

I’m curious as to what other gamers think about the exit hex dilemma…thoughts?

Vacation over!

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008

Vancouver IslandHi Volks…some of you may have noted a lack of posts on here lately. That’s because I was away on vacation enjoying beautiful Vancouver Island! We had some really nice weather here and I took full advantage of it. And now I am back into the swing of things…well…mostly.

We’ve finished playing Days of the Fox (great expansion!) and are looking for some new scenarios. Might be time to try out some more of the player made ones at FFG. At least until the Mediterranean expansion comes out for Memoir ‘44.

I was also in for a pleasant surprise when I came home to find that my next order of Pendrakens came in. Again, Dave was a pleasure to deal with and despite having a number of larger orders to fill, got mine to me in a very timely fashion. They look great and I can’t wait to paint them up and share some of the photos.